Health
Below you can see listed all of the Breeders registered with the Purebred Sheep Breeders Association of Nova Scotia who breed Health.

Can Cultural Competency Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities?

“The Caledon Institute of Social Policy committed to continue the data series following the demise of the National Council of Welfare in 2012. The figures presented in this report are based on the same methodology employed by the Council, thereby ensuring the integrity and comparability of the data series. The welfare incomes in this report represent the total amount that four typical households would receive over the course of a year. These households are: a single person considered employable, a single person with a disability, a single parent with one child age 2 and a couple with two children ages 10 and 15.
Total welfare incomes consist of the sum of two main components:
ï social assistance
ï provincial/territorial and federal child benefits as well as relevant provincial/territorial and federal tax credits.
It is important to note that the amounts shown for welfare represent the maximum paid for basic needs. Households may receive less if they derive income from other sources. Some households may be eligible for more than the amounts identified here if they have special health- or disability-related needs.”


The Health and Recovery Peer (HARP) Program – A Peer-Led Intervention to Improve Medical Self-Management for Persons with Serious Mental Illness

ObjectivesPersons with serious mental illnesses (SMI) have elevated rates of comorbid medical conditions, but may also face challenges in effectively managing those conditions.
Methods
The study team developed and pilot-tested the Health and Recovery Program (HARP), an adaptation of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for mental health consumers. A manualized, six-session intervention, delivered by mental health peer leaders, helps participants become more effective managers of their chronic illnesses. A pilot trial randomized 80 consumers with one or more chronic medical illness to either the HARP program or usual care.
Results
At six month follow-up, participants in the HARP program had a significantly greater improvement in patient activation than those in usual care (7.7% relative improvement vs. 5.7% decline, p = 0.03 for group ? time interaction), and in rates of having one or more primary care visit (68.4% vs. 51.9% with one or more visit, p = 0.046 for group ? time interaction). Intervention advantages were observed for physical health related quality of life (HRQOL), physical activity, medication adherence, and, and though not statistically significant, had similar effect sizes as those seen for the CDSMP in general medical populations. Improvements in HRQOL were largest among medically and socially vulnerable subpopulations.
Conclusions
This peer-led, medical self-management program was feasible and showed promise for improving a range of health outcomes among mental health consumers with chronic medical comorbidities. The HARP intervention may provide a vehicle for the mental health peer workforce to actively engage in efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality among mental health consumers.


Do Active Labor Market Policies Promote the Well-Being, Health, and Social Capital of the Unemployed? Evidence from the UK

In recent decades, one of the most notable developments in social policy has been the expansion of active labour market policies (ALMPs): training schemes that aim to speed up unemployed people’s return to the labour market. At the same time, academic and political attention has begun to rethink the traditional ways in which social policies like ALMPs should be evaluated: away from typically economic-oriented outcomes towards health and social indicators, such as subjective well-being and social capital. This has led to an emerging argument that ALMPs can be used to improve the health and social environment of unemployment, which decades of research has shown to be associated with a wide range of deleterious outcomes. This paper tests this argument by analyzing longitudinal data from the long-running British Household Panel Survey and its successor Understanding Society. The results show that relative to open unemployment, ALMP participation is associated with increased well-being amongst the unemployed, although there is no effect on health or social capital.