Culturally appropriate
Below you can see listed all of the Breeders registered with the Purebred Sheep Breeders Association of Nova Scotia who breed Culturally appropriate.

Across the Colonial Divide: Conversations About Evaluation in Indigenous Contexts

This essay engages questions of evaluator role and indigenous peoples participation in evaluation within colonial and decolonization contexts. Specifically, I critique the Western emphasis on cultural competence and contrast the utility of ‘mainstream’ evaluation approaches alongside three indigenous inquiry models (Te Kotahitanga, Whakawhanaungatanga, and He Taniko) as utilized by/with indigenous Maori in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Using practical examples of evaluation projects conducted with and by Maori, the article highlights the very different ‘evaluation conversations’ happening amongst ‘mainstream’ practitioners—where the focus is on difference, competency, and issues of access—relative to those occurring amongst indigenous evaluators and communities—where evaluation praxis is framed within broader struggles for sovereignty and self-determination. By placing these paradigms in conversation with each other, I highlight the ways in which evaluation approaches that engage indigenous people and places are always representative of particular standpoints. This is because evaluation is unavoidably and simultaneous in dialog with the prevailing contexts of colonization and decolonization vis-a-vis the location and moment in which it occurs. The essay foregrounds the ways in which `mainstream’ evaluation’s preoccupation with issues of cultural competency fails to fully address the needs and aspirations of indigenous peoples. In contrast, the realization of Maori capacity to meet our evaluation needs as Maori, and as represented in the ongoing development and use of our own approaches and models, not only facilitates a more culturally meaningful evaluation process but also concurrently constitutes an expression of our sovereignty and agency.


A Systemic Approach to Culturally Responsive Assessment Practices

In an earlier paper, Slee and Keenan demonstrated that it was possible for tertiary education institutions to design culturally responsive assessment procedures that complied with standardized assessment policy. The authors’ paper described Growing Our Own, an initiative between Charles Darwin University and Northern Territory Catholic Education, which in 2009 began preparing in situ Indigenous teacher assistants for teacher qualification in very remote schools in the Northern Territory, Australia. The paper demonstrated that the university assessment policy accommodated Indigenous learning, reflecting students’ culture, remote learning context, world experience, primary language, family and community values and entry?level competencies. This article is a systemic response to recommendations arising from a recent external evaluation of Growing Our Own and seeks to demonstrate how the project’s approaches meet university assessment rules yet fit within a culturally valid framework.


Achieving Cultural Competence – A Diversity Tool Kit for Residential Care Settings

This tool kit was prepared exclusively for the Ministry of Children and Youth Services by Ruby Lam and Bernice Cipparrone, Diversity Specialists. While the Ministry has attempted to verify the accuracy of the information contained in this tool kit, users should not rely solely on this information to make decisions regarding children and youth in residential care. The content of the tool kit is provided by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services for informational purposes only and should not be taken as advice or recommendations for any particular decision regarding a child or youth in residential care. Use of the tool kit is voluntary. There are web sites linked to and from this tool kit that are operated or created by or for organizations outside of the Government of Ontario. Those organizations are solely responsible for the operation and information (including the right to display such information) found on their respective web sites. These linked web sites may or may not be available in French. The linking to or from this site does not imply on the part of the Government of Ontario any endorsement or guarantee of any of the organizations or information (including the right to display such information) found on their respective web sites. The Government of Ontario does not assume and is not responsible for any liability whatsoever for the linking of any of these linked web sites, the operation or content (including the right to display such information) of any of the linked web sites, nor for any of the information, interpretation, comments or opinions expressed in any of the linked web sites. Any comments or inquiries regarding the linked web sites are to be directed to the particular organization for whom the particular web site is being operated.